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I used to take the coach to Oxford every weekend to visit my girlfriend (now wife). The unmistakable sight of the Hoover Building on the A40 usually signals the end of the London 2-mph speed limit.

Initially, I thought it was a monstrosity. I then got used to it. Soon, I became fascinated with the history of the building, and art deco architecture in general.

However, I did not have the idea of creating this site until recently.

After being unimpressed by the map-viewing experience of many websites on mobile devices in general, I decided I wanted to have a go at making a responsive website with google map as a main navigation element, to try and understand the problem, and come up with a usable layout.

This is how Art Deco London came about.

Of course, not an exhaustive listing of art deco architecture in London by any means, this list, however, represents some the most visually stunning buildings in my opinion.

Please provide feedback or simply get in touch by tweeting me!

Acknowledgements:

I would like to thank all those Flickr users whose Creative Common photos I have used for this site.

I also found this site to be full of excellent information.


See Wah Cheng @seewahcheng

No buildings found...
55 Broadway
Headquarters of London Underground. Famous for the collection of relief sculptures known as the Four Winds by Eric Aumonier, A H Gerrard, Eric Gill, Henry Moore, Samuel Rabinovitch and Allan Wyon.

Charles Holden (1929)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
ABC Cinema, Streatham
William R. Glen III (1938)
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Acton Town Tube Station
Charles Holden (1932)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Adelaide House
Sir John Burnet, Tait and Partners (1925)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Alaska Factory
Used to be a seal fur factory. Now flats.

Wallis, Gilbert and Partners (1930s)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Alfies Antique Market
Apollo Victoria Theatre
Ernest Wamsley Lewis, William Edward Trent (1929)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Arnos Grove Tube Station
Charles Holden (1933)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Arsenal Stadium
Converted to flats, after the Arsenal football team moved to the current Emirate Stadium.

Claude Waterlow Ferrier, William Binnie (1930s)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Balham Tube Station
Charles Holden (1926)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Battersea Power Station
Immortalisd on the cover of the Pink Floyd album, Animals. Now awaiting redevelopment into very expensive flats.

Halliday and Agate, Sir Giles Gilbert Scott (1934)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Boston Manor Tube Station
Stanley Heaps (1934)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Broadcasting House
The headquarters of BBC. Remember to check out the magnificent statues by Eric Gill. A modern extension echos John Nash's All Souls Church in front.

George Val Myer, Watson-Hart (1932)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Broadway Theatre, Catford
Bradshaw Gass & Hope (1932)
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Brockwell Lido
H. A. Rowbotham, T. L. Smithson (1937)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Carlton Cinema (ABC Cinema)
Used to be a bingo hall - now derelict.

George Coles (1930)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Carreras Cigarette Factory
M. E. Collins, O. H. Collins, A. G. Porri (1928)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Chiswick Park Tube Station
Charles Holden (1932)
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Christ the King Church, Oakwood
Constantine Bosjchaerts (1939)
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Clapham South Tube Station
Charles Holden (1926)
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Clissold Court
Unknown (1935)
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Colliers Wood Tube Station
Charles Holden (1926)
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Coty Building
Now a private clinic.

Wallis, Gilbert and Partners (1932)
Origin image credit
Daily Express Building
Now occupied by Goldman Sachs. There are two similar buildings in Manchester and in Glasgow.

Sir Owen Williams, Ellis and Clark (1932)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Daily Telegraph Building
Again, occupied by Goldman Sachs.

Thomas Smith Tait (1928)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Dagenham Civic Centre
E. Berry Webber (1936)
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Daimler Hire
Now occupied by McCann Erikson the advertising agency.

Wallis, Gilbert and Partners (1931)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Derry & Toms (Barkers)
Bernard George (1938)
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Dorset House
T. P. Bennet, Joseph Emberton (1935)
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Du Cane Court
George Kay Green (1937)
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Ealing Common Tube Station
Charles Holden (1931)
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Earls Court Exhibition Centre
Plan for demolition.

C. Howard Crane (1937)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
East Finchley Tube station
Charles Holden (1939)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Eastcote Tube station
Charles Holden (1939)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Elsley House
Florin Court
Fictional residence of Poirot.

Guy Morgan and Partners (1936)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Gainsborough Road Public Baths
Now home of Cre8.

Percival Holt (1935)
Origin image credit
Gaumont State Cinema
A large number of famous bands performed there including the Beatles.

George Coles (1937)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Gillette Factory
Now derelict.

Sir Banister Flight Fletcher (1937)
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Greenwich Town Hall
Now a dance agency.

Ewart Culpin & Son (1939)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Grosvenor Rayners Lane Cinema
Now Zoroastrian Centre For Europe.

Frederick E. Bromige (1936)
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Gwynne House
H. V. Kerr (1934)
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Hartington Court
Landmark development in Chiswick.

John E. Adams (1938)
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Hay's Wharf
H. S. Goodhart-Rendel (1932)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Highpoint I
Berthold Lubetkin (1935)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Hoover Building
The building that started my fascination with British Art Deco. Now owned by Tesco, and yes you can actually do your grocery-shopping there!

Wallis, Gilbert and Partners (1935)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Hornsey Town Hall
Reginald Harold Uren (1935)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Hounslow West Tube Station
Stanley Heaps, Charles Holden (1931)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Ibex House
Fuller and Foulsham (1937)
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Ideal House
Raymond Hood, Gordon Jeeves (1928)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Imperial Airways Building
Now the National Audit Office.

Albert Lakeman (1938)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Isokon Building
Walter Gropius, Marcel Breuer, Agatha Christie resided there.

Wells Coates (1934)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
JCDecaux
Unknown (1936)
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Michelin House
Now a posh restaurant.

Fran̤ois Espinasse (1911)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Millennium Mills
Now derelict.

Unknown (1933)
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Mornington Court
Nestl̩ Factory (Hayes Cocoa)
Wallis, Gilbert and Partners (1932)
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Odeon, Beckenham
William Crombie (1930)
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Odeon Coronet, Woolwich
Now a Pentecostal church.

George Coles (1937)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Odeon, Holloway
C. Howard Crane (1938)
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Odeon, Leicester Square
Harry Weedon, Andrew Mather, Thomas Braddock (1937)
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Odeon, Richmond Hill
Leathart & Granger (1929)
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Osterley Tube Station
Stanley Heaps, Charles Holden (1934)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
OXO Tower
Albert Moore (1928)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Parliament Hill Lido
H. A. Rowbotham, T. L. Smithson (1938)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Phoenix Cinema
Howes and Jackman (1938)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Pinner Court
H. J. Mark (1936)
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Poplar Baths
Victorian baths rebuilt and converted to theatre in the 30s. Grade-II listed, it is currently derelict.

Unknown (1933)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Pullman Court
Conceived to be an apartment block of one and two bedroom flats, this development initially attracted opposition as nearby residents felt that housing for single people was bound to encourage prostitution!

Frederick Gibberd (1936)
Origin image credit
Pyrene Building
Wallis, Gilbert and Partners (1930)
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RACS, Lewisham
Now a gym.

Unknown (1933)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Rainbow Theatre
Edward A. Stone (1930)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Rio Cinema, Dalston
Not to be mistaken with the one in Burnham-on-Crouch in Essex.

F. E. Bromige (1937)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Ripaults Factory
Now a MAN/ERF office.

A. H. Durnford (1936)
Origin image credit
Rivoli Ballroom
Functioning ballroom with an exquisite interior. It has featured in many music videos, and occasionally it hosts gigs by unexpected big-names e.g. The White Stripes, Florence + The Machine and Damon Albarn. I live in Brockley, and going past it always makes me think we are so lucky to have all these wonderful buildings preserved around us.

Unknown (frontage: 1931)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Royal Institute of British Architects
George Grey Wornum (1934)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Senate House
Inspired George Orwell's Ministry of Truth.

Charles Holden (1937)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Shell Mex House
Messrs Joseph (1931)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Simpsons, Piccadilly
Now a Waterstones bookshop. Beautiful interior.

Joseph Emberton (1936)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Southgate Tube Station
Charles Holden (1933)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
St Johns Court
On top of a Waitrose.

Origin image credit
St Olaf House
H. S. Goodhart-Rendel (1932)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Stanbury Court
Unknown (1936)
Origin image credit
Sudbury Hill Tube Station
Charles Holden (1933)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Sudbury Town Tube Station
Charles Holden (1933)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Sunlight Laundry
Still a laundry service after all this time!

F. E. Simpkins (1937)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Surbiton Railway Station
J. Robb Scott (1937)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Taymount Grange
High up on the top of Taymount Rise, this, along with Forest Croft nearby, is a real hidden gem in Forest Hill.

George Bertram Carter (1935)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
The Coronet, Holloway
Now a Wetherspoon.

William R. Glen III (1940)
Origin image credit
The Capitol, Forest Hill
Another Wetherspoon.

J. Stanley Beard (1929)
Origin image credit
The Forum
My first ever gig to see Fugazi. Since then, I have also seen Godspeed You! Black Emperor perform in the Forum.

J. Stanley Beard (1934)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
The Grampians
Maurice E. Webb, Stanley Hinge Hamp (1937)
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The Laboratory Building
Now flats.

Unknown (1938)
Origin image credit
The Rex, Stratford
Formerly the Borough Theatre, the Rex served as a music venue and a club until recently. Now lying derelict.

George Coles (1933)
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Tooting Bec Tube Station
Charles Holden (1926)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Tooting Broadway Tube Station
Charles Holden (1926)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Troxy
George Coles (1933)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Uxbridge Tube Station
Charles Holden, L. H. Bucknell (1933)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Victoria Coach Station
Wallis, Gilbert and Partners (1932)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Walthamstow Stadium
Stadium demolished, with the facade retained.

Unknown (1933)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
William Booth Memorial Training College
Salvation Army training college. You can visit the museum inside. Even better, there is a magnificent view of south London, IF you get to climb to the top of the tower (I did that during London Open House).

Sir Giles Gilbert Scott (1929)
Origin image credit   |  Wikipedia entry
Yardley Factory
Now called Warton House.

Higgins & Thomerson (1937)
Origin image credit
Showing 102 of the most deco buildings in London!